The week after Christmas…

It’s the time between Christmas and New Year. The great build-up to Christmas is over. Weeks – maybe even months – of planning have culminated in two or three days of festivities and, like the Christmas dinner which is consumed so quickly after being prepared so carefully, we are left scratching our heads and wondering what it was all about.

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What do you do with this week, this week of anti-climax, of emptiness and nothingness? Some keep on partying: there are still friends to see and things to do; the week is a flurry of visits and coffee reunions and lunch dates and dinner parties. Others get straight back to work and pick up the threads as if Christmas didn’t happen. For the rest of us, we have the week off and it feels…..empty….as if we are in limbo, caught between what was and what will be.

On the one hand, we enjoy the days without deadlines, with no agenda except what we choose to put there, spontaneously if we want to – personally I think one of the things I enjoy most about this week is not to have the alarm clock shrieking in my ear first thing in the morning and rushing out the door to try to beat the traffic. We can get up later and we can stay up later: and in between we can choose what we do – and do nothing if we want to. Many of us catch up on some rest after a frenetic month of December.

But somewhere in the midst of the ‘doing nothing’ of this week, many of us begin to wonder about what we are leaving behind and what we are heading towards as the new year approaches.

My niece Sharon is a gifted writer and has written a piece over on her blog where she encapsulates this sentiment beautifully: ‘In January I pick a ‘word for a year’ and in December I have to make peace with how that’s worked out for me!’.

Ah, the looking back and the looking forward. How did I do this year? How do I lay the year to rest, come to terms with the failures, celebrate the victories? And how will I enter the new year? Should I choose a word for the year? How can I prepare for a new year? Of course some people still make new year resolutions, while many others have long since decided it’s not worth the effort, for they will be broken before the end of January.

This tension of simultaneously  living in the ‘now’ and the ‘not yet’ is not new. The biblical writer to the Hebrews wrote about it like this:

Each one of these people of faith died not yet having in hand what was promised, but still believing. How did they do it? They saw it way off in the distance, waved their greeting, and accepted the fact that they were transients in this world. People who live this way make it plain that they are looking for their true home. If they were homesick for the old country, they could have gone back any time they wanted. But they were after a far better country than that—heaven country. You can see why God is so proud of them, and has a City waiting for them. Hebrews 11:13-16.

I find it interesting that the writer talks about homesickness and people who are looking for their true home. I think when we feel this tension between what we have already and we don’t have yet, we are experiencing a kind of homesickness. It is a deep aching in our souls for what we do not yet have. It is a longing for home.

We have so much through Christ already. As we have just celebrated at Christmas, Jesus came to earth as a little baby in order to be able to welcome us to his eternal home. But we aren’t there yet. We live in a messy world where there is fear, sickness, war, brokenness and death.

My daughter Gemma is another gifted writer and she has written a blog about this longing for home which she ends by saying:

And so, my prayer this Christmas:
Immanuel, come.
To the lonely, the scattered, the unknown, the waiting, the afraid, the unprotected, the needy, the longing. To us.
Come.

Paul Tripp has shared these words:

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As a friend recently posted on Facebook: Christmas may be over -but God is still present – Immanuel.

Take him with you into the new year.

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6 thoughts on “The week after Christmas…

  1. I love those in between days!!! I think because, as you say “somewhere in the midst of the ‘doing nothing’ of this week, many of us begin to wonder about what we are leaving behind and what we are heading towards as the new year approaches.” There is certainly a pensive sadness to it too, that homesickness, but it does us to good to make room for it, as you have done with this post. Thank you x

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